Headline »

July 25, 2019 – 3:32 pm | One Comment | 3,707 views

Soup Name:  Chinese Chicken Herbal Soup
Traditional Chinese Name: 清雞湯 (qīng jī tāng)

Introduction:
The Chinese have a whole repertoire of herbs which can be added to …

Read the full story »
Soups for Children

Soups that are designed and suitable for children of all ages.

Spring Soups

Soups designed to remove humidity and cleanse the body of toxins.

Summer Soups

Summer soups that help relieve heatiness, cool the body and provide additional internal moisture for those extra hot days.

Fall Soups

Soups that have have the balance of removing heatiness and are slightly warming. These soups are good transition soups into winter.

Winter Soups

Soups designed to be consumed in the dry and cold winter months where the body needs replenishment of moisture and warmth.

Home » Featured Articles

If Only I Could Bathe in My Soups…

Submitted by on September 15, 2010 – 8:15 pm14 Comments | 51,166 views

To my readers:  Project Food Blog is a competition hosted by foodbuzz to find the ultimate food blogger.  I am an active participant – here’s my profile and this is my first challenge.  Voting officially opens September 20, 2010, so please stay tuned and support this “foodie” by voting!  Tis fun!

Here’s my take on being a foodie – you don’t have to be chewing something in order to classified as a foodie.  In my case, you could call me a subclass of foodie, represented by a very small and unique group of individuals whose palette prefer a little more H2O.  I am a soupie.  The market I serve and my clientele are also very unique, they are also soupies.  More specifically, Chinese soupies.  It is in this segment of foodies that I breathe and thrive on.  My love of Chinese soups is so deep that it runs in my blood and veins and family.  I mean of course, by birth, I am born with a last name of “soup” (so this must be fate!) and as far as I remember, soup was the first and most important course of any meal – and still is!

So here I am.  Sharing, exploring and documenting my love of Chinese soups.  Selfishly, I would say that it’s my own personal recipe book.  As a Chinese who can’t read Chinese (shame on me!), many of the available resources of Chinese soups simply aren’t accessible to me and because my mother, aunt, mother-in-law and grandmother don’t have any documented recipes – I need something tangible to pass on to my kids so they can share with their friends and family the wonders of Chinese soups.

The great thing about Chinese soups is that there are recipes that are so simple, they are for the newbie soupie.  But don’t discount the Chinese techniques of double-boiling and finding quality (yet unique) ingredients that bring out the ultimate soupie in us.  While Chinese soups can be defined as a Science because of predefined ingredients and amounts, I’ve gotten to the point where I don’t really follow fixed quantities and simply go with my gut – which goes to show that Chinese soup creation is also an art.  But the best part of it all, is that those who drink my soup ask for seconds.  That alone is worth the effort.

“If only I could bathe in my soups….”

14 Comments »

1 Pingbacks »

Leave a comment!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also Comments Feed via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.