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Soup Name: Monkey Head Mushroom with Chinese Yam in Pork Broth
Chinese Name: 猴頭菇豬湯 (hóu tóu gū zhū tāng)
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Home » 2-star, Chicken, Savoury, Soups for Children, Vegetables

Chinese Radish and Chicken Soup

Submitted by on November 29, 2015 – 3:51 pm4 Comments | 52,313 views

With winter well on it’s way, I can’t think of a better way to warm up after returning home from the cool outdoors than by drinking a warm Chinese soup — it will warm you from the inside out.

This one is relatively easy to make, is great for children and may be helpful as we are well into cold & flu seasons as there are mild benefits that may be helpful. The chicken soup base provides a nutritious base, while the apricot kernels help with phlegm expulsion (for those pesky coughs). In addition, the wolfberries are high in antioxidants, irons and vitamin A and C. The carrots and Chinese radish add sweetness and, if you eat them (which we hope you do!) are deliciously filling, too.

Hope you enjoy this soup and bundle up!

Soup Name: Chinese Radish and Chicken Soup

Traditional Chinese Soup Name: 青紅蘿蔔雞湯 (qing hóng luóbo ji tāng)

Chinese Radish and Chicken Soup
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Chinese
Serves: 6 bowls
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Prepare the chicken
  2. Soak the wolfberries and apricot kernels in room temperature water
  3. Start boiling the water.
  4. Cut the carrots and Chinese radish into pieces (if serving children, chop into bite-sized cubes)
  5. When the water boils, combine all ingredients
  6. Bring to a full boil
  7. Boil on medium heat for at least 1.5 hours
  8. Serve and enjoy!

 

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4 Comments »

  • YT says:

    Hi, can I check if I use thermal cooker, would I need to reduce the amount of water or I should boil the soup at least for a certain amount of time before placing in the thermal pot.

  • Irene says:

    Hello!

    I have a question about the Chinese herbs for soups. Do we have to refrigerate unused herbs or just keep in a air tight container. My mom just moved in with me and there’s no more space in the fridge!

    Thanks a bunch! Love all you soup recipes!!

  • LadyTong says:

    Dear Irene,

    HA! My fridge is exactly the same when my mom visits, too!! Actually, I keep them in the freeze (dried scallops, shrimps, chinese mushrooms). Other ones I do keep in the fridge. However, this is because I’m in Hong Kong where it’s humid and wet and things just don’t keep well in normal circumstances. My mom (back in Toronto), keeps most of the Chinese herbs in the pantry in sealed containers. It depends where you live. G’luck and all the best! Thanks for your continued support! Lisa

  • LadyTong says:

    Dear YT, boil the soup for at least 30 minutes on medium boil first before using the thermal cooker. It’s not necessary to reduce the amount of water. The idea is that you’d want the water hot enough, circulated enough and all the ingredients had a good boil before putting it into the pot. Put it while it’s boiling, you’ll notice that the water is still circulating round and round the pot. It’s really quite neat. Lisa

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